NAPSNet Daily Report
 
thursday, january 24, 2002
Navigation
 
CONTENTS

I. United States

II. Republic of Korea III. People's Republic of China IV. Japan
*  

Policy Forum Online:
Bush Administration's Asia Policy

Special Reports

Week in Review

South Asian Nuclear Dialogue

Nuclear Policy Project Flash

Ethical Governance Of Investment Biweekly Update


Browse Past Reports:
* Preceding Daily Report
* Daily Report Archive
* Search Daily Reports:


Email Services:
* Signup for Email Delivery
* Latest Report Emailed Now
* Send Comments
* Daily Report Credits


I. United States


next 
itemcontentscontacts

1. US-Philippines Anti-terrorism

Agence France-Presses ("US GIVES MILITARY AID TO PHILIPPINES AS IT HUNTS MUSLIM REBELS," Manila, 01/24/02) and Agence France-Presse ("US FORCES POUR INTO SOUTHERN PHILIPPINES AS SENATE QUESTIONS DEPLOYMENT," 01/24/02) reported that the US is giving the Philippines eight helicopters, a high-speed naval vessel and 30,000 M-16 rifles which can be used in joint operations against Muslim guerrillas. Other equipment in the military aid package includes night-vision goggles and weapons that allow M-16 rifles to shoot grenades. "This equipment will be turned over to the Philippines military to be used as they desire," a US Defense official said, speaking on condition of anonymity. Next month, approximately 600 US troops will participate in joint operations with Philippine soldiers against the Abu Sayyaf Muslim guerrillas in the southern Philippines. The US soldiers will not be involved in combat but some of them will join Philippine patrols seeking Abu Sayyaf guerrillas in their jungle hideouts.

The New York Times (James Brooke, "OPPOSITION TO U.S. FORCES IS FADING IN THE PHILIPPINES," Zamboanga, 01/24/02) reported that Philippines Vice President Teofisto Guingona Jr. reversed his initial stance and backed the impending arrival of US soldiers who will advise Philippine troops battling armed Muslims in the southern Philippines. Guingona said today that he accepted a Justice Department position that the Philippine president had "valid authority" to proceed with the US deployment. "Regardless of any feelings that I have, we have to respect the official stand of the Department of Justice," Guingona stated after an emergency National Security Council meeting. Government Senate leaders said after the meeting that there was an emerging bipartisan consensus. The minority leader, Aquilino Pimentel Jr., said some senators still had qualms about the American military presence, "although, in general we support it."


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

2. DPRK-Japan Mystery Ship Incident

Agence France-Presse ("NKOREA HAD SECRET TALKS AFTER MYSTERY SHIP SINKING: REPORTS," 01/24/02) reported that diplomats from Japan and the DPRK met secretly in the PRC after the sinking of an unidentified ship in the East China Sea last month following a firefight with Japanese patrol boats. Unnamed Japanese government sources report that DPRK and Japanese foreign ministry officials held talks in Beijing in late December. Talks through embassies or other normal channels are impossible as the two countries have no diplomatic ties. Chief Cabinet Secretary Yasuo Fukuda sidestepped direct confirmation or denial of the report, saying he thought "the report may have been based on conjecture." The ship has so far not been conclusively identified as DPRK in origin, although the Japanese coastguard retrieved the bodies of two Asian men with Korean character writing on them, including a tag on a lifejacket. The bodies of the two men were cremated Wednesday, Kyodo News agency said.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

3. ROK Sunshine Policy

Agence France-Presse, "SOUTH KOREAN PRESIDENT INSISTS SUNSHINE RAYS WILL LAST BEYOND TERM," 01/24/02) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-Jung insisted his Sunshine will outlive his stint in power, despite opposition threats to drop it. "Whether we will call it the Sunshine Policy or not, I think it will continue" with the next administration, said Kim. Kim announced, "We received a proposal from the North publicly saying that it wishes to resume dialogue not only between the private sectors but between officials of the two governments." However, Kim remained cautious about prospects for an immediate revival of inter- Korean dialogue. He said he would "wait and see" to see what comes of DPRK media reports of an appeal to the ROK for renewed talks. Lee Hoi- Chang, the frontrunner for this year's presidential election, renewed criticisms on Kim's Sunshine Policy. In a speech to a Washington-based US think tank, Lee said, Kim's policy of trying to draw the DPRK into peace is an "overreaching, overgenerous" strategy. "North Korea needs to understand that our relationship is a two-way street -- there is no free ride."


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

4. Cross-Straits Relations

Reuters (Brian Rhoads, "CHINA SOFTENS STANCE ON TAIWAN RULING PARTY," Beijing, 01/24/02) reported that the PRC signaled a softened line on Taiwan on Thursday saying that only a small number of the island's pro- independence ruling party members were separatists. PRC Vice Premier Qian Qichen stated, "We believe there is a distinction between the vast majority of Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) members and a very small number of stubborn Taiwan independence activists. We invite them to tour and visit in an appropriate status to promote understanding." An unnamed western diplomat commented, "We have seen this gradual evolution in [the PRC's] attitude towards the DPP from absolute, sheer horror at President Chen to a more sophisticated united front tactic." Jin Canrong of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences also noted, "This is a significant shift in the treatment of the DPP. In the past, we treated the DPP as one entity, but now we're separating a handful of separatists from the ordinary members of the party."


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

5. US Military in Central Asia

Reuters, (Olga Dzyubenko, "U.S. HAS NO PLANS TO STAY IN CENTRAL ASIA," Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 01/24/02) reported that the US does not plan to maintain a permanent military presence in Central Asia despite a substantial buildup of troops there now. Speaking after his meeting with Kyrgyzstan's President Askar Akayev in Bishkek, General Tommy Franks, commander of the US-led Afghan campaign, said that even without a troop presence the US would remain involved in the region as it continued its campaign against violent militants. "We will continue to have discussions with each of the countries in the region as well as a great many around the world," he said. Sergei Yushenkov, deputy chairman of the State Duma's security committee, said that it makes sense for the US to say that the bases are temporary, but to keep them indefinitely anyway. "I would not consider [Franks'] statement as the final decision of the United States," he said. "Central Asian countries may ask for these bases to have temporary status. But I think these countries will ask the United States to prolong that period as long as possible." There are now some 200 Americans at Kyrgyzstan's Manas airport near Bishkek and this will eventually build up to around 3,000 and some 40 aircraft. [Ed. note: This article also appeared in today's edition of the US Department of Defense's Early Bird news summary.]


II. Republic of Korea


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

1. DPRK Invitation of Former U.S. Diplomat

Joongang Ilbo (Choi Won-ki, "NORTH ASKS FORMER U.S. DIPLOMATS TO PAY A CALL," Seoul, 01/24/02) reported that four former U.S. ambassadors to the ROK will visit Pyongyang on February 19 at the invitation of the DPRK's Foreign Ministry. Donald Gregg, Richard Walker and William Gleysteen, Jr., along with Stephen Bosworth, will make the trip, accompanied by University of California at Berkeley professor Robert Scalapino and researcher at the Center for Korean Studies at the University of California at Berkeley K. A. Namkung. The visit is a part of a nongovernmental program organized by Professor Scalapino to promote better relations between the DPRK and the US. "North Korea has a tradition of using non-governmental diplomacy, and that tradition has been successful in the past," said Chon Hyun-joon, a researcher at the Korea Institute of National Unification. "The proposed visit will play a positive role in improving DPRK-US relations based on that tradition."


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

2. US Base Relocation Talks

Joongang Ilbo ("SEOUL FORMS GROUP FOR U.S. BASE TALKS," Seoul, 01/24/02) reported that the ROK Ministry of National Defense announced on Wednesday that it would form an intra-government council to negotiate the relocation of the US military base in Yongsan. The prime minister is expected to head the council, which will begin its work of laying out overall strategy and objectives in the first half of the year. The ministry said it formed its own group, led by Lee Sang-hee, head of the strategy planning headquarters of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, earlier this week. Hwang Eui-dong, spokesman for the ministry, said Lee would be the ROK's chief negotiator when talks with the US military resume.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

3. Inter-Korean Tourism Joongang Ilbo (Jeon Ick-jin, "RAIL TRIP OFFERS VIEW OF NORTH," Paju, 01/24/02) reported that beginning in March, ROK citizens and foreign tourists can travel by train to a once-restricted area north of the Imjin River. "The construction of the four kilometer section from the Imjin River Station to Torasan Station part of the inter-Korean Gyeongui railroad is complete," an official at the National Railroad Administration said Tuesday. The ROK has been rebuilding the 12- kilometer section linking Munsan, Gyeonggi province to Jangdan Station, near the Military Demarcation Line, since September 2000. The Torasan station is just one stop south of Jangdan. The DPRK is supposed to link Jangdan with Pongdong Station, which is 12 kilometers north of the demarcation line. Civilian access to a swath across the peninsula spanning between 5 and 20 kilometers south of the Southern Limit Line is tightly restricted. Once tourists arrive at Torasan, they will be able to take a shuttle bus to Torasan Observatory, where they can see the DPRK city of Gaeseong.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

4. ROK–Russia Relations

The Korea Herald ("VICE FOREIGN MINISTER OFF TO RUSSIA," Seoul, 01/24/02) reported that vice Foreign Minister Choi Sung-hong left for Moscow Wednesday to hold talks with his Russian counterpart, Alexandr Losyukov, on bilateral cooperation and Korean Peninsula issues. During his five-day trip, Choi plans to pay a courtesy call to Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov, officials said. Choi will seek Russia's cooperation for peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula, the official added.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

5. ROK–US World Cup Security

The Korea Times (Oh Young-jin, "SEOUL TO WORK WITH CIA DURING WORLD CUP," Seoul, 01/24/02) reported that the ROK government is planning a land, sea and air operation with the help of the US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and other foreign anti-spy organizations to keep the World Cup finals safe and secure. ROK National Intelligence Service (NIS) director Shin Kuhn said that his agency is coordinating with the CIA, and its operatives would be dispatched to the ROK to beef up security against terrorists. "We have received a list of 2,000 terrorists from intelligence agencies in the Middle East and alerted seaports and airports to block their entry into Korea," Shin said. The Armed Forces will also play an important role. The Army is responsible for perimeter guard of venues, while the Navy will step up patrols against those who would intrude by sea and the Air Force will increase patrols and strengthen air security. The air space over the venues and their vicinity will be declared off limits for air traffic.


III. People's Republic of China


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

1. DPRK-ROK Relations

People's Daily (Zhao Jiaming, "DPRK: TO CONSCIENTIOUSLY IMPLEMENT NORTH- SOUTH JOINT DECLARATION," Pyongyang, 01/24/02, P3) reported that the DPRK government, parties and social organizations jointly held a conference in Pyongyang on January 23. The joint conference called on the DPRK and the ROK to conscientiously implement their joint declaration, to push forward their dialogues and contacts, and to create a new prospect for the reunification of the Korean Peninsula, said the report.

People's Daily (Wang Linchang, "ROK SPEAKS POSITIVELY ON THE DPRK APPEAL," Seoul, 01/24/02, P3) reported that the ROK responded positeive regarding the January 23 joint conference of the DPRK and the DPRK's appeal to implement the North-South Joint Declaration.

China Daily ("DPRK APPARENTLY RESUMES WORK ON CROSS-BORDER RAILWAY," Seoul, 01/18/02, P12) reported that ROK President Kim Dae-jung said on January 17 that the DPRK is showing signs of resuming work on re-linking a cross-border railway with the ROK that remains severed since the Korean War. "I received a report on January 16 that the North is showing signs of restarting work on the railway, repairing living quarters at its construction site," Kim said during a luncheon with model police officers and other public servants. The inter-Korean railway, if completed, will connect Seoul with Pyongyang and continue to Shinuiju, a major city on the DPRK's border with China, the report said. "It's unfortunate if we can't go by train to China, which has opened its market," Kim said.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

2. DPRK-US Relations

China Daily ("US, DPRK HOLD MIA TALKS," Bangkok, 01/24/02, P11) reported that the US and the DPRK on January 23 began their latest round of talks aimed at resolving the fate of US servicemen still missing in action from the Korean War five decades ago. A US Embassy spokeswoman in Bangkok said representatives of the US Department of Defense met with DPRK officials in the Thai capital "to establish the framework" for a possible deal that would open a search for the missing US soldiers. This week's talks will "hopefully" result in the scheduling of investigations and excavations by US recovery teams inside DPRK.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

3. PRC-US Relations

China Daily (Hu Xiao, "SPOKESMAN CONFIDENT OF SINO-US RELATIONS," 01/23/02, P1) reported that the PRC said on January 22 that it sees no impact on other PRC-US issues as a result of the reported discovery of bugging devices on President Jiang Zemin's US-built private airplane. When asked if the affair would affect US President George W. Bush's visit to the PRC next month, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Sun Yuxi said: "I have heard about this, but so far I have no knowledge of it and don't see any impact of this event on other issues."


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

4. Cross-Straits Relations

China Daily ("ONE-CHINA POLICY VITAL FOR DIALOGUE," Washington, 01/21/02, P2) reported that a senior PRC official said over the weekend that any cross-Straits dialogue must be based on the 1992 consensus and on the acceptance of the one-China principle. "Under that premise, anything can be discussed," said Zhou Mingwei, vice-minister of the Taiwan Affairs Office under the PRC's State Council. Zhou said that the one-China principle is the basis for launching cross-Straits dialogue and negotiations, improving cross-Straits relations, promoting exchanges, finally settling the Taiwan question and achieving peaceful reunification. He said that the PRC promotes this principle not to enlarge differences, but to resolve them.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

5. PRC Position on Anti-terrorism

People's Daily ("'EAST TURKISTAN' TERRORIST FORCES CANNOT ESCAPE THE RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE OFFENSES," Beijing, 01/22/02, P4) reported that the Information Office of the State Council of the PRC on January 21 released an article detailing how "East Turkistan" came about and what "terrorist" activities "East Turkistan" forces are engaged in. The article said that the "East Turkistan" forces inside and outside PRC territory have for a long time planned and organized a series of violent incidents including explosions, assassinations, arsons, poisonings and assaults in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region in some other countries, with the objective of founding a so-called state of "East Turkistan." The article calls on all peace-loving people throughout the world to see through all the disguises of the "East Turkistan" forces, and jointly crack down on their terrorist activities.


IV. Japan


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

1. Japanese Coast Guard

The Japan Times ("COAST GUARD VESSELS TO GET LARGER-CALIBER MACHINE GUNS," Tokyo, 01/22/02) reported that the Japan Coast Guard will install long-range machine guns on its larger patrol vessels in the wake of last month's shootout in the East China Sea. The officials said the 30mm automatically targeting machine guns are aimed at countering attacks like those last month. Ten coast guard vessels, including the Inasa and the Amami, two of the three patrol ships involved in the shootout, are equipped with 20mm machine guns. Once the new guns are installed, coast guard vessels will be able to fire more accurately and at a safer distance from their targets, they said. The coast guard has also decided to install the 30mm machine guns on new patrol vessels that will be deployed at the Fukuoka Coast Guard Office in fiscal 2004 as well as other vessels.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

2. Japanese POW Legislation

The Japan Times ("REVISIONS WEIGHED FOR LAWS DEALING WITH ATTACKS, POWS," Tokyo, 01/23/02) reported that the Japanese government unveiled on Tuesday a blueprint for proposed legislation for dealing with attacks on Japan, including a law to penalize inhumane handling of prisoners of war (POWs) and injured people. The plan was announced at a joint meeting of the Liberal Democratic Party's (LDP) three panels associated with defense issues. According to the legislative blueprint, a domestic law would be passed to impose penalties on serious offenders of the Geneva Convention, which stipulates humane treatment of POWs. The government's blueprint also calls for laws to regulate procedures on how POWs and sick and injured soldiers of enemy countries are treated.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

3. Nuclear Waste Shipment

Kyodo ("NUCLEAR WASTE ARRIVES AT ROKKASHO," Rokkasho, 01/23/02) reported that a cargo of reprocessed highly radioactive nuclear waste arrived Tuesday on board a British freighter, the Pacific Sandpiper, at Mutsu- Ogawara port in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture. The freighter left Cherbourg in northern France for Japan on December 5 after COGEMA completed the reprocessing work. The waste from spent nuclear fuel removed from nuclear reactors in Japan will be stored at Rokkasho waste storage facility for 30 to 50 years.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

4. Nuclear Fusion Powers

Kyodo ("FUSION POWERS TALK," Tokyo, 01/23/02) reported that government officials and experts from Japan, EU, Canada and Russia gathered Tuesday in Tokyo for their second meeting on a next-generation nuclear reactor that the four parties are jointly promoting. The participants discussed the issue of where to locate the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor project as well as the cost issues during the two- day meeting, government officials said.


next 
itemprev. itemcontentscontacts

5. DPRK-Japan Mystery Ship

The Japan Times ("JAPAN PREPARING TO SALVAGE SHIP SUNK IN SHOOTOUT," Tokyo, 01/23/02) reported that Japan's minister of land, infrastructure and transport Chikage OhgiJapan stated that Japan is preparing to salvage the mystery ship that sunk last month in the East China Sea. "The coast guard is preparing a schedule to raise the suspicious ship. For the time being we want to gather information by using a robot to take photos," Ohgi said. She also said, "Since the suspicious ship sank in the Chinese exclusive economic zone, we want to notify China about the schedule through the Foreign Ministry." The coast guard is expected to use remote-control underwater TV camera to judge whether the ship can be salvaged. It will check the ship's conditions and whether it contains any dangerous materials. The wreck is about 90 meters under the surface. Meanwhile, Defense Agency chief Gen Nakatani said Tuesday that the Maritime Self-Defense Forces (MSDF) ended its search for the ship's missing crew members Monday.


prev. 
itemcontentscontacts

6. Japan-US Military Cooperation

Kyodo ("NAVY, MSDF DISCUSS DISASTER RELIEF," Naha, 01/23/02) reported that the US Navy and MSDF began a three-day meeting Tuesday to discuss cooperation in humanitarian and disaster-relief missions at home and abroad. Participants in the meeting are expected to exchange views on their capabilities for dealing with natural disasters and their capabilities for handling medical operations, the officials said. Participating officers included those from the US Navy's amphibious unit in Okinawa. Paul Schutlz, the commander of the amphibious unit, indicated in the meeting that the navy wants to hold the working-level meetings twice a year, they said.


The NAPSNet Daily Report aims to serve as a forum for dialogue and exchange among peace and security specialists. Conventions for readers and a list of acronyms and abbreviations are available to all recipients. For descriptions of the world wide web sites used to gather information for this report, or for more information on web sites with related information, see the collection of other NAPSNet resources.
We invite you to reply to today's report, and we welcome commentary or papers for distribution to the network.

Produced by the Nautilus Institute for Security and Sustainable Development in partnership with:
BK21 The Education and Research Corps for East Asian Studies
Department of Political Science Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Center for American Studies,
Fudan University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China
International Peace Research Institute (PRIME),
Meiji Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan
Monash Asia Institute,
Monash University, Clayton, Australia

Brandon Yu: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Timothy L. Savage: napsnet@nautilus.org
Berkeley, California, United States

Kim Young-soo: yskim328@hotmail.com
Seoul, Republic of Korea

Hibiki Yamaguchi: hibikiy@dh.mbn.or.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Saiko Iwata: saiko@akira.ne.jp
Tokyo, Japan

Hiroya Takagi: hiroya_takagi@hotmail.com
Tokyo, Japan

Peter Razvin: icipu@glas.apc.org
Moscow, Russian Federation

Wu Chunsi: cswu@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People's Republic of China

Dingli Shen: dlshen@fudan.ac.cn
Shanghai, People's Republic of China

John McKay: John.McKay@adm.monash.edu.au< /a>
Clayton, Australia

 
Global Peace and Security Program Northeast Asia Peace and Security Network DPRK Renewable Energy 
Project Nuclear Policy Project Non-Nuclear NATO Network Related Nautilus Projects NAPSNet Special Reports NATO Flash Nuclear Policy 
Update South Asia Nuclear Dialogue Nautilus Institute Publications Policy Forum Online Signup for Nautilus Email Services Nautilus Research Kiosk Send Feedback Global Peace and Security 
Program Staff Nautilus Institute Home Energy, Security and Environment Globalization and Governance Youth/Pegasus Program Digital Library Search the Nautilus Site